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Mobile News from greenrobot

Library updates, new releases, related developments in open source, mobile databases, and Android

mobile-handy-database-comparison

Mobile databases: SQLite and SQLite alternatives for Android and iOS

UPDATED 2020. At Droidcon Berlin, we noticed a lot of questions around databases. Many people weren’t aware of SQLite alternatives and Object-Relational Mappers (ORMs). Therefore, we follow up with an overview of the mobile database landscape.

What is a mobile database?

While Wikipedia defines a mobile database as “either a stationary database that can be connected to by a mobile computing device […] over a mobile network, or a database which is actually stored by the mobile device,” we solely refer to databases that run on the mobile device itself.

Why use a mobile database?

There are some advantages associated with using a mobile database:

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EventBus 3.2 with incremental annotation processing

EventBus 3.2.0 is now available on Maven Central. In 2020, seven years since version 1.0, EventBus is still one of the most used Android libraries. This update addresses advancements in the Gradle build system and supporting Android libraries.

EventBus 3.2 adds incremental processing to the EventBus annotation processor. This can greatly reduce build times – if all involved annotation processors play along (e.g. ObjectBox is getting there too).

The EventBus annotation processor is used when building EventBus with a subscriber index. This is now recommended for all Android apps. It improves run time performance and avoids crashes by looking up subscriber methods via reflection.

EventBus 3.2 also improves support for JetPack/AndroidX. When looking for @Subscribe methods, it now ignores all base classes from the androidx package and its subpackages, e.g. AppCompatActivity (from androidx.appcompat.app) or Fragment (from androidx.fragment.app). Before 3.2, those classes were scanned using reflection, regardless if a subscriber index was available or not.

Those two changes make EventBus faster and more resilient and we hope you consider making this update soon.

The EventBus library is free open source software. If you like it, we appreciate a star on GitHub, a tweet, or any feedback to us. If you use EventBus in a cool app that is a great showcase for its usefulness, we would love to share a case study with our community. Please get in touch.

EventBus 3.1 with plain Java support

With over 25% of the top Android apps using it, EventBus is more popular than ever before. So we’re very happy to announce EventBus 3.1 today. Starting with this release, EventBus works with plain Java (non-Android) projects. This has two major benefits: Firstly, it opens up EventBus for all Java developers and makes it usable for server and desktop applications. Secondly, it allows Android developers to use EventBus in local unit tests. Before, you had to use instrumentation tests which are slow and require a device. In contrast to this, plain Java unit tests are blazingly fast as they run directly on your desktop machine.
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